6 Gorgeous Places You Need To Explore In New Mexico

Campers looking for a magical landscape to explore won’t be disappointed with the spectacular sights, recreation, and camping options in New Mexico. Appropriately names The Land Of Enchantment, New Mexico is home to 17 national parks and monuments, 35 state parks, 5 national parks, and 25 wilderness areas.

If you’re planning a camping trip to new Mexico, here are 6 gorgeous destinations you don’t want to miss.

1. White Sands National Monument

Nestled in the heart of the Tularosa Basin in the Chihuahuan Desert you will find the these shimmering white gypsum sand dunes. At 275 square miles, this is the largest gypsum dunefield in the world. Home to unique plants and animals that have adapted to the harsh environment, White Sands National Monument is the perfect place to catch a magnificent sunrise, hike, or spend an afternoon sledding on the dunes.

2. Bandelier National Monument

Bandelier National Monument boasts some of the most unique ruins in the Southwest. Visitors have the opportunity to explore 33,000 beautiful acres featuring ancient cliff dwellings, pueblo villages, petroglyphs, hiking trails, narrow canyons, and towering mountains.

3. Carlsbad Caverns National Park

If you’re ready for an underground adventure, head to Carlsbad Caverns National Park. Made up of nearly 120 known caves, this otherworldly destination is one of the most popular places to visit in New Mexico. The caves feature various chambers of all shapes and sizes as well as colorful formations that continue to change to this day. Above ground, visitors can hike and backpack.

4. Chaco Culture National Historic Park

Chaco features the best preserved, largest, and the most architecturally advanced Pueblos in the southwest. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, this remote park is ideal for exploring, hiking, viewing the night sky, and diving into some intriguing history. Chaco was designated an International Dark Sky Park in 2013.

5. Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument

Initially used by nomadic people as temporary housing on the Gila River, the Gila Cliff Dwellings were eventually called home by the Mogollon people in 1200. They lived their lives here for 20 years before moving on, leaving behind these ancient walls for later generations to discover. After exploring the cliff dwellings, head out into the Gila National Forest for some hiking, horseback riding, fishing, or biking.

6. Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks

These intriguing cone-shaped formations, a result of volcanic eruptions that occurred more than 6 million years ago, are made up of ash, pumice, and tuff. The fragile tent-like formations are protected by caps that protect and help shape the softer cones below. Colors range from white to pinkish gray, and heights vary with some being a few feet tall while others rise nearly 90 feet into the air. Visitors can hike venture through slot canyons, birdwatch, and take in the gorgeous views of the Rio Grande Valley and surrounding mountains.


Ready to start exploring campgrounds? Discover your perfect New Mexico RV park, tent site, or cabin on Camp Native!

Jessica Goehring title: Administrator
Jessica is a freelance writer. She resides in Minnesota with her husband, dog, and 6 cats. In her free time she enjoys reading, traveling, and being President of the Introvert Club.